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Faux Glass Bottle with Mystic Liquid

I’ll be the first to admit that my posts lately haven’t been quite “creative”. My excuse is plain and simple. I haven’t had any crafting time lately. I added up how much I have crafted in the past two weeks combined and it was a grand total of about 2.5 hours. *sigh* Unfortunately a lot of that time was taken up by trying to get inspired. It seems like once I finally get on a roll it’s already time to stop because I have to do something else.  OK, enough with the excuses. I’m sure everyone knows what I am talking about. What I want to share today is a little faux Glass Bottle  with Mystic Liquid that I made using the new Graphic 45 Olde Curiosity Shoppe Cling 2 Stamp Set!

Supplies Needed:

• Transparency
•Vellum
•Stayz-On Ink ( I used Royal Purple)
•Archival Ink (I used black)
•Alcohol Inks (I used a total of 5 different colors but one color per image would probably be fine.)
•Distress Ink- Tea Dye or other brown color
• Acrylic Block ( I used the Fiskars Stamp Press)
•Non-Stick Craft Mat
•Heat Tool ( To dry archival ink if you’re impatient like me)
•Half of a Cosmetic Sponge or an Ink Blending Tool
•Scissors (I used my Tonic Studio scissors, but any scissors that allow you to cut a small image will work)
•Glossy Accents (or any other glue that will quickly dry vellum to transparency)
•Popsicle Stick (I used a mini one that came in a big pack in the kids craft section of Wal-Mart)
•…and of course your Graphic 45 Olde Curiosity Shoppe Cling 2 Stamp Set! ( or you could use a different bottle and label stamp set if you already have one.)

1. Mount your bottle stamp onto your block and stamp your image onto the transparency with stayz-on ink. I used the Fiskars Stamp Press because transparencies are slippery and I didn’t want to risk smearing my image. You can use a regular block just be careful to lift straight up when taking the stamp back up. Set these aside.

2. Put your Label Stamp onto your block and stamp onto Vellum using Archival Ink. If you are using the same stamp as I am and you want the label to fit in the label area of the stamp, then you will want to make a little bit of room between your images.  You can either set these aside to dry or dry them with your heat tool so you can move on to the next step.

3. Place the vellum label over the stamped image and lightly pencil in where you should cut the label to fit the bottle properly. Cut ou the label. Any pencil lines you can see will be covered up by the next step as long as you made them light. I also made a second bottle that I only cut around the circular part of the label. If that is what you prefer, then you would skip the lining up and penciling part of this step.

4. Dab the Distress Ink onto the vellum labels to make them look aged. Try blotting more in some areas than others to really give it that aged look. Blotting on a smaller surface is easier with this folded up cosmetic sponge than using the ink blending tool, in my opinion.

5. Ok, so now for the fun part! Decide what color you want your mystic liquid to be and grab those alcohol ink colors. If you are using multiple colors then start with the lightest and work your way to the darkest. Do not apply the alcohol ink directly to the transparency. Doing this will give you very little control. The alcohol ink will lift the ink off the transparency. (Tip: I remembered after making these that you could avoid the worry of lifting the ink off the transparency by simply flipping it over and using the alcohol inks on the other side. This would also give you a more finished look) Put one drop onto the tip of your popsicle stick and glide it around the areas that you want it to go. I did not use any alcohol ink blending solution. If you use the opposite side of the transparency then you can be a little more daring since you won’t need to worry about staying in the lines. When you are done adding alcohol inks cut out the bottle image.

6. Glue the vellum labels on the opposite side that you used the alcohol inks. I used Glossy Accents since I know it is quick drying and can hold these two materials together. The picture above is what they looked like when I first put the glue on. I ended up leaving these for about half an hour. When I came back I found that during drying they had curled. When the labels curled they still held tight to the transparency and the transparency curled right along with it. All I had to do was re-shape it with my hands and it went straight again.

Here is the finished product. I plan on popping these onto a bookmark that I am working on. If you look closely at the label on the right bottle you will see some crackle marks on the label. This happened when I was reshaping it after it had curled. I love the crackles. I feel like it just adds to the aged look that I wanted !

If you try this technique, please let me know !  I would love to see how yours comes out. I think using the alcohol inks on the opposite side will open up more possibilities of making the liquid in the bottle look more “liquidy” and not so potion-esque. However, I do like the potion look to it lol. I’m seriously tempted to make a chipboard cabinet and putting a bunch of these faux bottles into it!

Thanks for stopping by. Don’t forget to subscribe, comment, and check out my store at http://shop.intoxicatingarts.com . I have more Graphic 45 and Tim Holtz goodies in the mail as I’m typing. Yay!

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